Answers to Prayer

Image Credit:  GeorgeMuller.org

Confession Time

I have a confession to make.  Here goes…

I was at a church meeting this week.  Among other things, we were discussing whether and how to proceed on a particular matter.  There were many suggestions and much discussion, but in the end we decided to give it some more thought and revisit the matter at our next meeting.

Here’s the problem:  To our shame (and I am definitely included in the shame part), not one of us thought to suggest that we pray about it. Read More

The Ideal Team Player

Image Credit:  GreatSchools

I just finished reading The Ideal Team Player by Patrick Lencioni.  He was one of the speakers at the Global Leadership Summit 2016 organized by Willow Creek Association (for more information about the annual Global Leadership Summit, click here).  Lencioni is founder of The Table Group, a consulting firm that specializes in leadership, teamwork, and organizational health.

As I was reading the book, I was thinking about how the Church needs ideal team players.  As the Body of Christ, the Church is made up of many different parts that work together (1 Corinthians 12:12-26).  If those parts don’t work together as a team, the Body starts to malfunction and becomes an ineffective witness to Christ’s saving power. Read More

Justice and the Environment

Image Credit:  Snopes

The latest development in world politics is the United States’ withdrawal from the Paris Climate Agreement, a voluntary, non-binding covenant signed by 195 of 197 countries that are members of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change.  As for the two countries that didn’t sign the agreement, Nicaragua didn’t sign because there were no provisions in the agreement to punish countries that did not comply and Syria didn’t sign because they are currently in the middle of a civil war.  The US withdrawal will officially take effect on November 4, 2020, which is, coincidentally, the day after the next presidential election is scheduled to take place.

You may believe that climate change is real.  You may believe that it is a hoax.  For believers in Jesus, however, there are some things on which we can agree:  Read More

An Evangelism Reading List

Image Credit:  Christianity Today

PEI is having a real focus on evangelism in 2017.  ALPHA will be rolled out all across the Island in the fall and Will Graham’s Celebration of Hope will be held in Charlottetown in early November.  As part of my personal preparations for these events, I’ve been reading up on evangelism.  Here are some interesting evangelism-related blog posts I found this week:

To borrow from the Canadian Baptists of Atlantic Canada’s vision, how are you preparing to “join God in changing [PEI] one neighbourhood at a time”?  Have you read any interesting evangelism blog posts or seen any evangelism-related videos you’d like to share?

Word Power

Image Credit:  The New Church

Words are known to have power.  The phrase “The pen is mightier than the sword” may have been coined by Edward Bulwer-Lytton in 1839, but the idea was repeatedly expressed centuries earlier.  Friedrich Nietzsche said, “All I need is a sheet of paper and something to write with, and then I can turn the world upside-down.”  We saw the unfortunate power of words in Nazi Germany when Adolf Hitler realized that “all epoch-making revolutionary events have been produced not by the written but by the spoken word.”  Winston Churchill, an equally brilliant orator, used the power of words to rally Britain and its allies to defeat the Nazis despite overwhelming odds.  Words plant ideas in the mind; ideas turn into thoughts and thoughts turn into actions.

304110

Image Credit:  Board of Wisdom Read More

“Go… I Am With You Always”

Image Credit:  The Pastor’s Pages

This post is based on a sermon I preached at Murray River Baptist Church on July 10, 2016.

In Deuteronomy 1:6-46, Moses recounts the Israelites’ first attempt at occupying the land God had promised them.  Israel’s rebellion prevented them from occupying the land the first time.  God punished the Israelites by making them wander in the wilderness for 40 years until the entire generation that had rebelled had died (with the exception of Joshua and Caleb).

We, both individually and as the Church, are like Israel in many ways.  We regularly rebel against God and forget what God has done for us.  We sometimes place our faith in people and things rather than in the Creator.  In the New Testament, Paul tells us to learn from Israel’s rebellion so we can avoid the same pitfalls and temptations (1 Corinthians 10:1-13).  The writer of Hebrews tells us the same thing in Hebrews 3:1-4:13.  Jude 1:5 says, “So I want to remind you, though you already know these things, that Jesus first rescued the nation of Israel from Egypt, but later he destroyed those who did not remain faithful“, referencing the very history recounted by Moses in Deuteronomy 1.  With this in mind, we can learn a few things from Israel’s experience. Read More

Head First

Image Credit:  International Biblical Training

Self-help gurus have been touting the benefits of positive self-affirmations for years.  They claim that telling yourself positive messages will re-program your subconscious mind so you will naturally act in a way that makes those messages become reality.  Studies have shown that positive self-affirmations can, in fact, be helpful for some.

There are other situations, however, where self-affirmations can cause more harm than good.  In one study, people with low self-esteem who were asked to repeat phrases such as “I accept myself completely” and “I am a lovable person” felt worse afterward.  Why?  When someone repeats positive statements that come into conflict with their perception of themselves, it seems to reinforce their original belief about themselves rather than reverse it.  These people actually felt better after repeating the negative statements about themselves that they already believed, but that’s not helpful if you’re trying to change your mindset so you can have a healthy self-esteem. Read More

The World is Watching

Image Credit:  Know Your Meme

Wow!  We’ve seen some pretty bad public relations missteps in the past week or so:

  • First, it was the Pepsi ad that, amazingly, united the Internet in mockery and hatred of the ad to the point that Pepsi issued an apology and pulled it the day after it was released.
  • Next, it was United Airlines forcibly removing an already-seated passenger from an airplane to make room for airline employees who were due to work at the flight’s destination the next day.  The Internet responded again, calling for boycotts and smearing the airline’s image with snide memes and advertising slogans.  The day after the incident, United’s CEO issued a public statement apologizing “for having to re-accommodate these customers” and an internal memo that defended the actions taken by employees, which was promptly leaked to the media.  Backlash became even more heated and the resulting drop in United’s share price finally elicited a proper apology from the CEO a day later.  Ironically, this is the same CEO who was dubbed Communicator of the Year by PRWeek only weeks ago.
  • To top it all off, White House Press Secretary Sean Spicer made a major gaffe on Tuesday by saying that, unlike Syria’s Assad, Hitler at least had enough decency not to use gas on his own people.  It seems Spicer’s knowledge of history isn’t very strong considering Hitler made regular use of gas chambers during his extermination of German Jews (and other “undesirables” plucked from Germany’s citizenry).  The only thing more stunning than the statement itself was its timing — the week leading up to Passover, a major Jewish holiday — and the number of follow-up statements it took for Spicer to issue a satisfactory apology for his inaccurate and insensitive comparison.

Read More

Passport 2017: Journey to Easter

Image Credit:  Anglican Journal

Guest post courtesy of First Baptist Church, Charlottetown, PEI

Welcome to Holy Week, that deeply spiritual period that spans from Palm Sunday to Easter Sunday.

I encourage you to enter into a time of personal preparation by using this devotional booklet as a passport to the passion of Jesus.  All through Holy Week, the sanctuary of First Baptist Church in Charlottetown, PEI, will be set up with various interactive stations designed to immerse you in the final days of Jesus’ life, from His Triumphal Entry to the Last Supper, the cross, and ultimately the Resurrection.  You are invited to use this booklet as a self-guided “Journey to Easter”.  Call the church office (902-628-2111) to book a time for your group or for yourself.

Eight contributors from First Baptist Church have penned these articles.  May God guide you by His Spirit as you seek to walk the path Jesus trod into the joy of the New Life!

Easter blessings,

Pastor Dave

Download your copy of Passport 2017 – Journey to Easter.

2017 Easter Events at PEI Baptist Churches

Image Credit:  Happy Easter 2017

Palm Sunday, April 9:

April 11-13:

  • Self-guided “Journey to Easter” interactive stations at First Baptist Church, 235 Prince Street, Charlottetown; please call the church office at 902-628-2111 to book a time for you or your group

Maundy Thursday, April 13:

Good Friday, April 14:

Easter Sunday, April 16: